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CENTENARY COLLEGE 



OF LOUISIANA 



CONTENTS: 

An Open Letter 

Full Texl of (he Deed of Transfer 
From the Board of Trustees la 
the Legal Conterence 

An Ode 

Chronicles of Centenary College 



Dedicated to (he Members of the Louisiana 
Annual Conference of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church South 



37S<37<U 

C. -/f YVA 

To the Brethren of the Louisiana Conference and the Methodists 
of Louisiana : 

Dear Brethren — At the last meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees of Centenary College, the transfer of the college property to 
the Legal Conference was made in exact accord with the Com- 
promise Judgement rendered at Clinton and also in accord with 
the resolution of the Louisiana Conference at its last session in 
New Orleans. 

I have thought it necessary and believe it to be expedient to 
send out this circular letter containing an exact copy of the 
transfer in order that all parties interested may be in possession 
of all the facts of the case. 

By virtue of this transfer the Legal Conference becomes the 
absolute owner of the property subject to the conditions of the 
charter and the acts of the Legislature and the original title deed 
passed before Lafayette Sanders, whereby Judge McGehee be- 
came the owner of the property. 

Please note that the original act required "that the afore- 
said College shall not be appropriated to any other purposes than 
a literary institution. 11 Please note further that the Charter 
granted by the State expressly stipulates that it is the purpose of 
the charter that the Board of Trustees is to "continue in charge 
of the college we have already established at Jackson, Louis- 
iana." And further that the College has power "to confer such 
degrees as are usually granted by any university, college, or 
seminary of learning in the United States," and hold property 
"to the value of Three Hundred Thousand Dollars, which shall 
never be appropriated to any other purposes and uses other 
than the establishment and support of an institution of learning. " 

Now Brethren, I appeal to your sense of reason and justice 
in the spirit of the Master. Will an Insane Asylum meet and 
satisfy the conditions set forth in the terms of the compromise ? 
Will a high school or a secondary school of any character or 
grade meet the conditions ? The Board of Trustees have acted 
in good faith. A sacred trust was confided in that Board, and 
it has transferred that trust into the keeping of one branch of 
the Church of Christ. That trust will not be betrayed, impaired 
or rendered nugatory. 



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2 



It will be seen by reading the act of transfer that two things 
have been done. First, the Methodist Church has acquired in 
the name of its own legal corporation and subject to its own 
control, property worth $100,000.00 to which before it had no 
legal record title. Second, it has assumed an obligation to 
maintain at Jackson, the College already established there in 
accordance with the charter, the compromise, and the original 
act of purchase by Judge McGehee and "the statutes of this State 
on the subject matter." 

The question arises, can the church in Louisiana support 
two colleges ? Can it violate its moral obligation by attempting 
to dispose of this property, which it cannot even legally dispose 
of? Can it evade its obligation by allowing Centenary College 
to die of inanition ? We answer all these questions in the nega- 
tive. 

We ask another question. Even if there were no moral or 
legal objections in the way, is it common sense for the church to 
throw away this valuable property and try to raise funds to pur- 
chase and build elsewhere ? We again answer no. 

The Methodist Church now has in Centenary College an 
educational institution of the highest grade, and most honorable 
reputation, buildings without doubt the noblest in the south, a 
situation healthful, intelligent, moral and easily accessible. 

The original management has passed away, and the men 
who have controlled it have already resigned or will soon resign. 
The l<egal Conference at its next meeting can and should elect a 
new board, a new president, and faculty, if they, desire, and 
should call on the Methodists of Louisiana to rally to and im- 
prove that which is now their own. 

It is suicidal folly to barter away $100,000.00 worth of 
valuable property, and nearly a hundred years of honorable 
history for a foolish, vain, chimerical, inchoate, intangible, un- 
realizable dream of acquiring property and endowment else- 
where, the accomplishment of which would be fraught with 
dishonor and nullified with illegality. 

Brethren — it is time for this ill fated attack upon our noblest 
child to cease. It is time for you, under your own management 
and in your own way to develop and foster this institution which 



can and should be made the crown and flower of your educa- 
tional system in Louisiana. 

Nothing prevents success here, but lack of union. By a 
united effort 300 students can be placed upon this campus at the 
opening of next session. Our desolate places can be built up, 
and the halls which in bygone years rang with the eloquence of 
Davis, Benjamin, and Ellis, be again gladdened by the presence 
of the noblest of our youth to press on to the high rewards of 
learning as did their fathers in bygone years, 

C. C. Miller, 
President Centenary College. 

June 12, 1905. 



Deed of Transfer. 



State of Louisiana, \ 
Parish of East Feliciana, J 

Before me, Robt, S. Austin, a Notary Public duly commis- 
sioned and qualified in and for the Parish of East Feliciana, 
State of Louisiana, and in the presence of legal witnesses here- 
inafter named and undersigned, 

Personally came and appeared S. S. Keener, President of 
the Board of Trustees of Centenary College of . Louisiana, duly 
authorized hereto by resolution of said Board of Trustees, passed 
on the 5th day of June, A. D. 1906, a certified copy of which is 
hereto attached and paraphed "Ne Varietur" to agree herewith, 
who declared that acting by virtue of said resolution he has con- 
veyed and does hereby make formal conveyance unto the Legal 
Conference of the Louisiana Annual Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church South, herein represented by John T. Sawyer, 
President of the Legal Conference of the Louisiana Annual 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church South of all the 
property belonging to said College for the reasons and on the 
terms and on conditions set forth in the judgment rendered in 
the suit of John C. Keener et als. vs. the Legal Conference of 
the Louisiana Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church South, No. 413 on the docket of the 24th District Court, 
Parish of East Feliciana, State of Louisiana, and for the reasons 



4 



and upon the terms and conditions set forth in the act passed be- 
fore Lafayette Sandsrs on June 5th, 1845, and upon the terms 
and conditions of the Charter approved by the Governor of Lou- 
isiana on June 29th, 1848, which judgment, act before Lafayette 
Sanders of June 5th, 1845, and Charter approved June 21st, 
1848, are all made a part of this act for certainty of description 
of the Property transferred, and as setting forth the terms and 
conditions on which it is conveyed by said Board of Trustees, 
and is accepted by said Legal Conference, and which said judg- 
ment, act of June 5th, 1845, and Charter approved June 29th, 
1848, are in words and figures as follows, viz : 
"John C. Keener et als. vs. No. 413 24th District Court, 

the Legal Conference of the Parish of East Feliciana, 

Louisiana Annual Cotiference State of Louisiana. 

Methodist Episcopal Church 
South et als. 

In the above entitled cause, on motion of counsel for all 
parties, plaintiffs and defendants, and upon the suggestion of 
counsel that the parties had composed their differences, and had 
compromised respecting the matters set forth in the petition of 
plaintiffs and in order to put an end to the litigation and to avoid 
future litigation or dispute the .said parties had agreed upon and 
consented to the judgment and decree here set forth ; and the law 
and the evidence being in favor of the same. It is now here 
ordered, adjudged and decreed that the property described in the 
plaintiff's petition, to-wit: That property at Jackson in this 
Parish consisting of fifty acres more or less, originally conveyed 
by John H. Horton and James H. Ficklen of the Parish of East 
Feliciana, on the third day of February 1816, by public act be- 
fore John H. Johnson, Parish Judge, together with all of the 
buildings, improvements, library, apparatus and paraphernalia of 
every kind and character thereon situated or thereunto belong- 
ing, also a certain lot of ground at corner of East College Street, 
running east and west by residence of Mrs. S. C. Schwing in the 
said town of Jackson including all the property rights and 
credits appertaining to Centenary College or known as such, be 
and the same is hereby recognized and declared hereafter to be 
the property of the Legal Conference of the Louisiana Annual 



5 



Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and the 
Board of Trustees of Centenary College shall and will without 
delay make formal conveyance thereto by public act and the 
said Legal Conference shall and will by the same public act ac- 
cepting title thereunto upon and subject to all the conditions 
contained in the act passed before Lafayette Sanders on the fifth 
day of June, 1845, and agreeing to maintain a literary institu- 
tion at Jackson, La., and to comply with the statutes of this 
State on the subject matter and with the terms of the Charter or 
act of incorporation approved by the Governor of the State on 
June, 29th, 1848, and shall and will by the same act bind the 
said Legal Conference to use the whole endowment fund and 
notes and proceeds thereof as they now exist for the use and be- 
half of said literary institution only at Jackson, La:. 

It is further ordered and decreed that the restraining order 
be recalled and temporary injunction quashed, and the writ de- 
nied and that the costs of these proceedings be borne in equal 
part by plaintiffs and defendants. 

Done, read and signed in open court this 28th day of 
November, 1905. 

Joseph L. Golsan, 
Judge of 24th Judicial District. 



Deed of Slate of Louisiana lo Jud^e McGehee. 



_ State of Louisiana, \ 
Parish of East Feliciana. J 

Be it known and remembered, that on this the fifth day of 
June in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-five, before me, Lafayette Sanders, Parish Judge of the 
Parish of East Feliciana and ex officio Notary Public in and for 
the same, personally came and appeared William Debuys, Esq., 
Treasurer of the State of Louisiana, who did declare and say 
that for and in consideration of the sum of Ten Thousand Dol- 
lars to be paid to him as Treasurer aforesaid or his assigns or 
successors in office in three equal annual installments the same 
being secured by notes of even date herewith. 

He has sold and delivered to Edward McGehee, Esq. , of 



6 



Wilkinson County, State of Mississippi, all the rights, privileges, 
titles and interests which the State has in and to the College of 
Louisiana and its appurtenances on a credit of one, two and three 
years payable in equal annual installments bearing interest at the 
rate of five per cent per annum from maturity until paid, provided 
that the aforesaid College shall not be appropriated to any other 
purposes than a literary institution being the same property this 
day sold at public auction in the town of Jackson by Lafayette 
Sanders, Parish Judge of said Parish and ex officio auctioneer, 
in and for the same after the notices and advertisements required 
by law and in conformity with an act of Legislature of the State 
of Louisiana approved March 8th, 1845 and entitled an act for 
the sale of the College of Louisiana and for the purposes and bid 
off by the said Edward McGehee, Esq., for the sum of Ten 
Thousand Dollars, lie being the last and highest bidder and hav- 
ing complied with the terms of the sale by executing his three 
several promissory notes for the sum of 3,333 and one- third dol- 
lars each with David Thomas and John McKowen securities. 
And the said William Debuys, Esq. , Treasurer as aforesaid and 
in said official capacity does hereby warrant the said property to 
the said Edward McGehee, Esq., his heirs and assignees to the 
extent contemplated and required by the said act of the Legisla- 
ture and as further and the said Edward McGehee, Esq., 
accepts the sale in manner and form made as aforesaid and with 
the conditions aforesaid aud the parties aforesaid consent and 
agree to waive a certificate of mortgage as required of the 
Notary. And the said Edward MeGehee further consents and 
agrees that the record of this deed in the Parish Judge Office of 
the Parish of East Feliciana aforesaid shall have the force and 
effect of a mortgage on the property herein alienated until full 
and final payment of said sum of Ten Thousand Dollars all in- 
terest that shall accrue on same in consequence of a failure to 
make punctual payment. 

In testimony of all which the parties aforesaid signed here- 
unto the one granting the other accepting at the town of Jack- 
son, Parish of East Feliciana the day and date aforesaid in the 
presence of the said Judge and John B. Higginbotham and Phil- 



7 



lip Fishburne subscribing witnesses. The said parties, judge 
and witnesses all signing in presence of each other. 
Witnesses: 

John B. Higginbotham. William DeBuys, 

P. Fishburne. State Treasurer. 

Edward McGhee, 
L. Sanders, 
Parish Judge, 



Charier of Centenary College of Louisiana. 



We, Williams Winans, James H. Muse, David Thomas, Ira 
Bowman, Robert Perry, Joseph Carmina, John McVea, A. T, 
Simmons, John S. Lewis, John W. Burrows, John Robson, L. 
H. Stockett and James M. Elani, a majority of whom, to- wit, 
James H. Muse, David Thomas, Robert Perry, John McVea, 
A. T. Simmons, Ira Bowman and Joseph Carmina are residents 
of the Seventh Judicial District of the State of Louisiana be- 
lieving that education is a sure support of a Republican Govern- 
ment and that as Southern men we should support Southern 
education, are desirous for educational purposes to avail our- 
selves of the benefit of the act of the Legislature of the said 
State approved on the third day of April, A. D. 1847, entitled 
"An Act Providing for the Organization of Certain Corporations 
in the State' ' and as trustees to be incorporated under the name 
and style of the "Centenary College of Louisiana" to continue 
in charge of the college we have already established at Jackson, 
La. , and hereby present to the Governor (the District Attorney 
approving) the following act of incorporation to-wit : 

Section 1. It is hereby ordered by the Governor of Lou- 
isiana, the District Attorney of the Seventh Judicial District ap- 
proving, that Williams Winans, James H. Muse, David Thomas, 
Ira Bowman, Robert Perry, John McVea, A. T. Simmons, John 
S. Lewis, Joseph Carmina, John W. Burrows, John Robson, L- 
H. Stockett and James M. Elani, Trustees of the Centenary Col- 
lege of Louisiana at Jackson and their successors in office are 
hereby constituted and declared to be a body politic and corpo- 
rate by the name and style of the Centenary College of Louisia- 



s 



fla, a majority of whom shall form a quorum and at their regular 
animal meeting five of whom shall form a quorum for the trans- 
action of business and such members as the Trustees shall ap- 
point at their regular sessions shall constitute a committee with 
power to transact all necessary business in the interim of the 
regular sessions of the Board. 

Sec. 2. And be it further ordered that said corporation 
shall be possessed of all general powers, privileges and emolu- 
ments now secured to similar corporations by the Constitution 
and laws of this State and shall have power to sue and be sued 
and plead and be impleaded in any court of law or equity in this 
State and to have and use a common seal, to hold property, real 
and personal to the value of Three Hundred Thousand Dollars, 
which shall never be appropriated to any other purpose and uses 
other than the establishment and support of an institution of 
learning, to adopt such by-laws as they shall deem expedient for 
the accomplishment of the trust reposed in them, not repug- 
nant to the Constitution and I^aws of said State, to appoint such 
officers as may be necessary and to fill all vacancies that may 
occur in their own body in such manner as they shall prescribe. 
They shall also have power to establish and continue by such 
plan as they may desire a Board of Visitors with power to sit in 
their meetings and vote in the election of the various members of 
the faculty the making of by-laws and conferring of degrees. 
They shall have the further power to establish such schools as 
they may consider advisable to elect and continue a president and 
professors therefor who shall constitute the faculty of said college 
having power to govern and conduct the same according to the 
by-laws which may from time to time be made as aforesaid and 
bind with the said Trustees to confer such degrees as are usually 
granted by any university, college or seminary of learning in 
the United States. 

Sec. 3. And be it further ordered, etc. , that said corpora- 
tion shall have power to receive such funds, lands or moneys as 
may be given to it in trust for the endowment of any professor- 
ship or other permanent endowment which may be established 
in said college, which funds shall be used for no other purpose 
than in strict accordance with the trust. The principal of such 



endowments shall not be diminished, but the interest annually 
accruing may be applied according to the will of the donor or 
the support of the professorship or other object of endowment. 
And for the purpose of raising interest upon such funds or 
moneys received as aforesaid, the said corporation shall have 
power to loan out at interest, or invest them in such manner and 
upon such security as shall be deemed more advisable for the 
entire preservation and security thereof, and to appoint such 
agents therefor as may be necessary or expedient. But the said 
Trustees or their agents shall never have power to appropriate 
the principal of any fund for general purposes, which has been 
given for a special endowment nor shall the same, or the college 
library, or fixtures and appurtenances of the same, or apparatus 
belonging to the same or the furniture or other movables belong- 
ing to the college buildings and used by the same ever be liable 
in law or equity to be seized, sold or applied to the liquidation 
of any debt or debts which the said corporation may create. 
But always to be held and used by the said" trustees sacredly as 
a perpetual endowment for the purposes specified and the annual 
interest or net proceeds only to be used as aforesaid. 

Sec. 4. And be it further ordered that the president of the 
faculty shall always be ex officio a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees and that this act shall take effect from and after it is signed 
and recorded according to the statutes aforesaid. 

Signed by the Trustees, June 2, 1848. 

Williams Winans. A. T. Simmons. 

David Thomas. Joseph Canuina. 

John H. Muse. John W. Burrows. 

Ira Bowman. John Robson. 

Robert Perry. H. 1,1 Stockett. 

John McVea. James S. Lewis. 

James M. Elam. 

I, Zalegman S. Lyons, District Attorney in and for the 
Seventh Judicial District of the State of Louisiana, do hereby 
certify that I have perused and examined the foregoing written 
application to his Excellency, the Governor of the said State, in 
which the applicants, a majority of whom reside in said District, 
propose to associate themselves for literary, scientific, and edu- 



to 



eational title of the Centenary College of Louisiana, and it fe 
my opinion that all and every objects, articles and conditions in- 
said application set forth and certified are lawful. 

(Signed) Z. S. I/tons, 
23rd June, 1848. Dist. Atty. Jud. Dist Louisiana. 

Executive Office, New Orleans, 20th June, 1848 r 

Having examined the constitution and by-laws of the Cen- 
tenary College of Louisiana and concurring in the opinion of the 
District Attorney as above expressed, said constitution and act 
of incorporation is in accordance with law, transmitted to the 
office of the Secretary of State for record at the expense of the 
applicants. 

(Signed) Isaac Johnson, 
Governor of Louisiana. 

I certify the foregoing to be a true copy of the act of in- 
corporation of the Centenary College of Louisiana, which being 
approved by the District Attorney for the Seventh Judicial Dis- 
trict and by the Governor of State has been this day duly en- 
rolled in conformity with law in the archives of my office. 
Given under my hand this 29th day of June, 1848. 

Chari.es Gayarre, 
Secretary of State. 

State of Louisiana, 1 
Parish of East Feliciana. J 
I certify that the foregoing copy was this day duly recorded 
in this office in Miscellaneous Acts Book A, page 421, 422, 423. 

Given under my official signature and seal this the first day 
of June, 1871. 

John A. Morgan, Recorder. 

State of Louisiana,! 
Parish of East Feliciana. J 

I certify the foregoing to be a true copy of the Charter of 
Centenary College of Louisiana on file and record in this office. 

Given under my official signature and seal this third day of 
July, 187L 

Henry Hawford, Deputy Recorder. 



it 



And the said Legal Conference of the Louisiana Annual 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, through 
John T. Sawyer aforesaid, its said representative does hereby ac- 
cept the said transfer upon all the terms, conditions, and stipula- 
tions contained and set iorth in the said judgment, the said act 
before Lafayette Sanders of June 5th, 1845, and the said Charter 
approved June 29th, 1848. 

In testimony whereof the parties here signed hereto this 
fifth day of June, A. D. 1906 in the presence of me Notary 
and the two undersigned subscribing witnesses. 

Board of Trustees of Centenary College, 

per S. S. Keener, Vice President. 
Legal Cenference of the Louisiana An- 
nual Conference of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church South, 
Witnesses: per John T. Sawyer, President. 

D. H. Tayeor. 
Guy M. Tomb. 

Robt. S. Austin, Notary Public, 

Resolution of the Board of Trustees of Centenary College 
of Louisiana, at a regular meeting held at Jackson, La., the 5th 
day of June, A. D. 1906. " 

Be it resolved, that pursuant to the compromise and Judg- 
ment rendered in the suit of John C. Keener et als vs. the Legal 
Conference of the Louisiana Annual Conference of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church South, No. 413 on the docket of the 
24th Judicial District Court, Parish of East Feliciana, State of 
Louisiana on the twenty-eight day of November, A. D, 1905. 

The acting President, Dr. S. S. Keener, of the Board of 
Trustees of the Centenary College of Louisiana be and is hereby 
instructed to make formal conveyance by public act to the Legal 
Conference of the Louisiana Annual Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church South of all the property of the said Centenary 
College of Louisiana as described in and in accordance with and 
on the conditions set forth in said judgment. 

I certify that the above is a true and correct copy of a reso- 
lution passed by the Board of Trustees of the Centenary College 



12 



of Louisiana on June 5th, 1906, at a regular meeting held that day, 

S. S. Keener, Vice President. 

H. N. Pharr, Secretary. 



The following little poem recited by Miss Carrie May Miller 
at Centenary College in June, 1905, is the production of her 
father. The only apology he offers for sending these lines to the 
press is the gratification of personal vanity.— C. C, M. 



An Ode to Centenary. 

I,ast night as I lay dreaming in a slumber sweet, 

I saw a galaxy of great men one and all, 
Some did outshine the stars that twinkle in the sky, 

While others, numerous as the burning snns, 
That form the milky way, 

Looked down upon my couch and smiled. 
Like one of old on Patmos' lonely isle I questioned, 

' 'Who are these all robed in white ? — this countless throng V 5 
A guardian angel from the throne divine 

Stood by my side, sublime, 
And great men pointed out both place and time. 

"Tis mine to guard an hollowed spot, 
Where Centenary cast her sacred lot, 

A place than which no other is dearer 
To Providence and me and yon bright throng. 

'Tis fanned by Southern breezes and kissed by sunny skies 
Beside the Feliciana River its walls arise. 

No augury of birds, like ancient Rome 
Marked out her destiny — or home, 

Jehovah inspired the hearts of princely men 
To build this monument of undying fame. 

His -hand scattered the seed from which the monarch oak 
The beech and elm and lordly pine awoke, 

He summoned from its crimson seed 
The ever-green magnolia — graceful boughs — 

And strewed the campus with wild flowers, 
He scattered jasmines with his fingers 

And peopled all the air with merry song-birds. 
Men burning with the zeal of heaven, 

As if it were an inspiration given, 
Builded her walls, her columns and her domes, 

Every brick cemented with a prayer. God smiled 
And the very bells of heaven chimed for joy." 



13 



And then ine saw a lordly form 

Whose beams outshone the luster of the sun. 
"For one star differeth from another star in glory." 

"This form," the angel said, "upon the glossy sea, 
Commemorates a patron and a noble man 

A patron saint — for such was Judge McGehee," 
And then me thought of Abraham and Chaldea. 

Abraham — Chaldea, McGehee — Centenary. 
"The founder of a nation and the friend of God." 

The founder of a college and the friend of man. 

And then me thought me heard a bugle blow 

A blast that blended with the din 
Of horrid war and Judah Benjamin 

From these dear college walls, as if by fate, 
As secretary to Confederate State 

Became a part of Davis' cabinet. 
He was a man to royal honor born 

And when the flag was furled at Appomattox 
And Southern hope and cause forlorn 

Was made attorney by an English queen. 
And then me thought me heard the famous "rebel yell" 

And borne upon the breast of its terrific swell 
Me saw mid lurid war and shot and ball 

Brave noble youths upon our campus fall. 
Under our sighing pines beneath the verdant sod, 

They sweetly sleep and wait the solemn trump of God. 
Where can a Southern soldier find a sweeter rest 

Than on a hallowed campus by tradition blest 
Where Jeff Davis as a youth sought knowledge 
Within the walls of our dear college. 

And then me heard the silver notes of oratory grand, 
Resounding through the length and breadth 

Of our dear native land, 
And E. John Ellis, proudly great, 

Was leader in congressional debate. 

O, for a voice, a tongue, a pen 

To chronical the deeds of Centenary-men ! 
In every walk of life, at home — abroad 

By word and deed they've answered to the voice of God. 
Her sons have worn with jealous care 

Judicial ermine, pure and fair, 
And one elected in the Done Star State 

In the chair of governor sate. 
Her honest sons have tilled the soil 



14 



That blossomed like the rose of Sharon 
And Providence has blessed the oil 

Like that which flowed upon the priestly Aaron. 

For eighty years the smile of God 

Has hovered o'er these buildings grand — 
For eighty years she's fought the fight 

And scored upon the golden strand. 
Her heritage can ne'er be told; 

Her triumphs ring beyond the skies. 
A white-robed throng on streets of gold 

Her praises voice in Paradise. 
Oh! if there could be tears in heaven, 

Could angels weep or seraphs sigh 
'Twill be when men forget the past 

And let this institution die. 

The shades of Winans, Wall and Drake 

And Charles Green Andrews on the height 
With Rush and Wiley and a host 

With pain and sorrow view the sight. 

Now may I speak of one not yet ascended 

Upon whose hoary head and trembling form 
Rest four-score years and with them blended 

The sparkling dew of heaven's morn? 
One who is both the friend of God and man. 

One who has always hoped and prayed and smiled. 
One who has never lost his faith 

In his belov'd adopted child. 

It needs no seer or prophet bold 

To call the name which I withhold, 
For all of life is made serener 

Whene'er we think of Bishop Keener.* 

O, God from thine eternal throne on high 

May wisdom unto holy men be given 
To heal the breach so sadly riven 

And may its record be in heaven. 

*Since the above verses were written our beloved Bishop has asscended. I beard a 
voice from heaven saying unto me, Write, blessed are the dead which die in the Lord 
Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of bis saints. 



13 



The Chronicles ol Centenary 



One of (he Colleges of Louisiana, Which is Siluated in Ihe Province of 
East Feliciana, Among the Tribes of (he Jacksonites, rtDCCCCVI. 



CHAPTER I. 

1. Behold, it seemetli good unto Charlie-riah, the scribe, 
whose surname is Miller, to write those things which came to 
pass in the days when Newton, whose surname was Blanchard, 
was ruler over all the provinces of the land of Louisiana, and 
when Joseph, whose surname was Golsan, was one of the judges 
of the land, 

2. Now, there was a certain college which was called Cen- 
tenary, which was situated in the province of East Feliciana and 
in a certain city, which was called Jackson and in which dwelt 
all the tribes of the Jacksonites. 

S, And it came to pass that two score years before the 
death of Abraham, whose surname was Lincoln, and who was 
ruler over all the kingdoms from the Great Lakes on the north 
even to the great sea on the south, and over all the tribes on the 
east and the west, even to the rising and going down of the sun, 
that the chief ruler of Louisiana gathered together the captains 
and the judges and the counsellors and the sheriffs and all the 
rulers of the provinces and commanded them that they should 
hew down fir trees and make brick without straw and build 
a temple of learning, even the College of Louisiana. 

4. And it was done even as he commanded. 

5. Now it came to pass in the twentieth year before the 
death of Abraham, whose surname was Lincoln, that one of the 
patriarchs of the land, whose name was McGehee, who was rich 
in silver and in gold, and in man -servants and maid-servants 
and was greasest of all men of the land, that he took counsel 
with all the elders of the synagogues, which are called Metho- 
dists, and purchased the college for a possession in the presence 
of all the children of Feliciana before all that went in at the gate 
of the city. 

6. Now it was written in the deeds and in the decrees and 
in the pleas and in the writs and in the writings that came down 



16 



from the judges of the land, the thing is true according to the 
law of the Medes and the Persians, which altereth not, that the 
college was to remain in the land of the Jacksonites. 

7. Now it came to pass in the days when Henry, whose 
surname was Morrison, was high priest over all the synagogues 
of Louisiana, that the dwellers of Caddo, even the Shreveport- 
ites, dreamed dreams and said within themselves: 

8. Behold, it seemeth good unto us that we take unto our- 
selves the one little ewe lamb of the Jacksonites, even Centenary. 

9. And many of the prophets, which are called Methodists, 
said : Amen. 

10. Now the Sandedrim, which assembled aforetime in the 
city of the Mindenites, sent spies into the land of the Caddoites 
to spy out the land, whether it be fat or lean. 

11. So they went up and searched the land and came again 
unto the Sanhedrim and said: Surely it floweth with milk and 
honey. 

12. It is a land of grapes and pomegranates and figs, and 
they cut a branch of the voluntary tax and the subscription on 
paper and bare it between two on a staff. 

13. And the spies went up again into the land of the Cad- 
doites and sold the college, which is called Centenary, to the 
Shreveportites for a mess of red pottage. 

14. Now it came to pass that Henry Clay, whose surname 
was Morrison, and who was one from among the Kentuckians, 
with those who had sold the college, wrote writings to all the 
elders of the synagogues of Louisiana to bind them hand and 
foot as touching the doings of the spies, even the selling of the 
college which is called Centenary. 

15. Moreover Henry Clay, whose surname was Morrison, 
wrote writings with his own hand to the elders of the synagogues. 

16. Now it came to pass that when many of the elders h ad 
signed the writings which Henry had writ and came up before 
him to the great Sanhedrim that he spake in the presence of all 
the Sanhedrim and in the presence of all the people and declared 
that the writing he had writ and the "slips" they had made 
bound them before the High Priest. 

17. Now these things had not yet come to pass, for the 



time was not fully came; but they did come to pass about the 
space of three hours before Henry, who was a ready reader, was 
prepared to proclaim the provinces in which each of the prophets 
was to sojourn while he was High Priest over the land of Loii- 
isiana. 

18. Now there was Samuel, whose surname was Keener, 
and who was a sojourner among the Jacksonites, and there was 
Isaac, who was one among the doctors of the law and a dweller 
among the Clintonites, and there was Charlie-riah, the scribe, 
and other dwellers among the proviuces ot Louisiana, who went 
up before the judges of the land. 

19. Now the Shreveportites spake unto the Centenaryites 
in the presence of one of the judges of the land and said : Let 
there be a covenant betwixt me and thee and let there be no 
strife between thy people and my people. 

20. And behold, there was covenant made, even a compro- 
mise, and behold, the Centenaryites gave unto the elders of the 
synagogues the College, even Centenary, and made them rulers 
thereof. 

21. And the scribes and the lawyers wrote writings that 
were signed by one among the judges of the land, that the col- 
lege was to remain in the land of the Jacksonites according to 
the deeds and the decrees and the pleas and the writs and the 
writings, which aforetime had come down from the judges of the 
land. 

chapter n. 

1. Now it came to pass in the days when Henry, whose 
surname was Morrison, was a second time High Priest over all 
the provinces of Louisiana, that all the elders of the synagogues 
of the land went up before him to the great Sanhedrim, which 
assembled itself in the Crescent City, which is called in the 
Hebrew tongue New Orleans. 

2. Now the members of the Sanhedrim were wont to go up 
before the High Priest once a year to be scattered to east and to 
the west and to the north and to the south throughout all the 
provinces of Louisiana, even as the fan doth scatter the chaff 
from the threshing-floor. 

2. Now there were certain ones among the Morrisonites 



13 



and the Carterites and the Drakites and the Carre-ites and the 
Henry-ites and the Moore-ites and the Boggites and many of the 
prophets among the Wesleyans who sorely desired that the col- 
lege might be moved to the province of Caddo, and even to the 
city of Shreveport, notwithstanding the things which had come 
to pass before one of the judges of the land in the city of the 
Clinton ites. 

4. Now Samuel, who aforetime was one of the elders of 
the synagogue that had counselled with the High Priest, and who 
had been cast out of the counsel, and Horace, whose surname 
was White, and who was one among the doctors of the law, and 
Charlie-riah, the scribe, lifted up there voices with others of the 
Centenaryites against the doings of the Morrisonites and the 
Carterites and the Drakites and the Carre-ites and the Henry-ites 
and the Moore-ites and the Boggites and many others of the 
prophets, who were among the Wesleyans as touching the re- 
moval of the college, even Centenary, 

5. Now Charlie-riah, the scribe, arouse in the council of 
the Sanhedrim and bowed himself before the H igh Priest, even 
Morrison. 

6. And it came to pass that there was a great battle be- 
tween the Shreveportites and the Centenaryites, 

7. Now, Horace, who was one among the doctors of the 
law, desired and read the decrees and the writs and writings that 
had come up from the judges of the land, and behold they filled 
the camp with a tumult. 

8. Now a certain one among the members of the Sanhe- 
drim sent and brought John, whose surname was Clegg, who 
was not a member of the Sanhedrim, and who was among the 
Morrisonites and who aforetime was among the judges of the land. 

9. And he arose and made his obeisance before the High 
Priest and declared many things as touching the law and some 
among the members of the Sanhedrim marvelled greatly. 

10. Now, behold, the battle waxed hot, and there was one 
among the Shreveportites, who was an anti-Centenary ite, who 
arose from his place among the prophets and bowed himself be- 
fore the High Priest. 

11. But his speech came not, and, behold, he lifted up his 



(9 



voice and wept, even as one of the children of the land. 

12. And, lo, many of the prophets arose and some said one 
thing and some said another and there was a division among the 
people. 

13. Now Charlie-riah, the scribe's, countenance was 
changed and his thoughts troubled him, so that the joints of his 
loins were loosed and his knees smote one against the other, even 
as the knees of Belshazzar. 

14. And he feared greatly lest he should be driven out 
from the synagogue and be made to eat grass like the oxen, until 
his hairs should be grown like eagles' feathers and his nails like 
birds' claws. 

16. Now many of the wise men of the Sandedrim kept 
their silence throughout the long battle, which lasted many days. 

16. Now great fear came upon some of the members of the 
Sanhedrim because of the High Priest, least he should rise up in 
his wrath and them hurt. 

17. Now in the presence of all the people certain of the 
wise men from among the prophets spake, every man in his own 
tongue. 

18. Oiie from among the Sanhedrim arose in his place 
and said: Let us set at naught all the deeds and the decrees and 
the writs and the writings that come up from the judges of the 
land, lest they bind us and our children and our wives and our 
little ones. 

19. And some of the prophets said, Amen. 

20. Another spake and said : Let us wash our hands of 
the whole business, and shake off the dust from our feet and let 
our peace return unto us, as we leave the college, even Centenary. 

21. And some of the prophets said, Amen. 

22. Another rose from his seat among the prophets and 
said: Behold, it seemeth good unto me that we send the decrees 
and the judgments and the writs and the writings back to the 
judges of the land and let us thrash the whole matter out. 

23. And some of the prophets said, Amen. 

24. Now there was one among the council, who was one 
among the Morrisonites, who was wiser than all the members of 
the Sanhedrim, who said within himself : This college is worth 



20 



more than two hundred shekels of silver and a golden wedge 
and more greatly to be desired than a goodly Babylonish garment. 

25. And he arose and said : I move we accept the com- 
promise and the decree of one of the judges of the land. 

26. And all the prophets said, Amen. 

27. Now Samuel, whose surname was Keener, arose in his 
place and spake: Behold the day breaketh; I rejoice that the 
light is breaking in on the Sanhedrim. 

28. And it came to pass that Morrison, who sat in the high 
place, and was chief among the Shreveportites, arose from his 
place and said: Blot out my name from the commission, who 
do battle for the Shreveportites. 

29. Now it came to pass that before the prophets of the 
Sanhedrim had made an end of speaking that he, who was to 
become ruler of the church at Alexandria, stood up in the syna- 
gogue and said that some of the wise men in the council of the 
High Priest had conspired against Samuel, whose surname was 
Keener, to cast him even out of the Legal Conference over which 
he was chief ruler. 

30. And many of the Sanhedrim arose and bowed them- 
selves and said: Cast him out. 

31. And it was done even as they desired. 

32. And Samuel folded his tent and came into the land of 
the Raynites and dwelt under his own vine and fig-tree. 

33. And Charlie- riah, the scribe, went back to his tent 
among the Jacksonites. 

34. And every man folded his tent and took his journey 
and some went into the cities and became dwellers beside great 
waters and others sojourned in the waste places of the land. 

35. Now, Charlie-riah the scribe hath borne a faithful re- 
cord of some of the doings and sayings of the great Sanhedrim, 
which assembled in the Crescent City, which is called in the 
Hebrew tongue, New Orleans. 

36. Now the rest of the acts are written in the book of the 
Chronicles which Jeremiah, the scribe, whose surname is Parker 
hath written, which contains all the deeds of the great Sanhedrim .' 

chapter in. 

1. Now it came to pass in the fifth month and on the four- 



21 



teenth day of the mouth after the great "Battle of New Orleans," 
which was fought in the Sanhedrim among the Wesleyans, that 
all the law-givers of the land of Louisiana assembled in the city 
which is called Baton Rouge. 

2. Now a certain one which did us much evil and who 
was not a member of Legal Conference nor one among the Centen- 
aryites conceived and brought forth a bill for the sale of the college 
to the land of Louisiana, notwithstanding the compromise and 
the things which had come to pass before the judges of the land 
and in the Sanhedrim which aforetime had assembled in the city 
which is called New Orleans. 

3. But the law-malcers of the laud were stiff-necked and 
refused to be led to the slaughter in the appropriation of three 
score and fifteen thousand sheckels of gold for the purchase of 
the college to be used as a house for the demoniacs. 

4. And it came to pass that the bill ' 'died a borain. ' ' 

5. Now in the sixth month and on the fifth day of the month 
certain ones among the Centenaryites with certain A nti- Centen- 
aryites assembled themselves in the city of the Jacksonites that 
thoL'e things should come to pass which had been decreed by one 
cf the judges of the land in the city of the Clintonites. 

6. And the Centenaryites gave unto the Legal Conference 
of the Methodists of the land of Louisiana the college according 
to the covenant made in the presence of one of the judges of the 
land and according to the things that had come to pass at the great 
Sanhedrim which aforetime had assembled itself in the city 
which is called New Orleans. 

7. Now Samuel and Isaac and Jessee and James- and John 
and Charlieriah with others of those assembled wrote writings and 
gave them unto the hands of Henry, whose surname isPharr,who 
was an Iberiaite and a dweller in the land of Evangeline, that 
they should no more rule over the things of the college, but that 
there kingdom and their inheritance should be given to another. 

8. Now a great peace came upon all the people and Israel 
rejoiced that it was delivered from the hand of the enemy. 

9. But Israel had not yet repented, and another, plague was 
sent upon them, and it came upon them in the form of a Bill 
(a Mr. William if you please) which was to transmute the walls 



22 



and collanades and domes of the grand old "Literary Institu- 
tion" into gold, and translate it over the great river into the land 
of the Caddoites even to the city of Shreveport. 

CHAPTER IV. 

1. Now it came to pass in the sixth month and on the 
eighteenth day of the month in the year after the great Sanhe- 
drim, which had assembled itself in the city, which is called 
New Orleans, and on the two and twentieth day after the Board 
of Trustees had delivered the college into the hands of those, 
who were called Methodists, that the Legal Conference assembled 
itself in the Crescent City. 

2. Now Henry, whose surname was Pharr, and who was 
from the land of Evangeline, came into their midst and brought 
writings from each of the members of the Board of Trustees, 
even their resignations. 

3. Now the names of Horace and Isaac and Samuel and 
Jesse and Charlie-fiah, the scribe, and all the dwellers of the, 
province of East Feliciana, and that part of the land of Louisiana, 
in which the college was builded, were blotted out of the Board 
of Trus- tees who aforetime had ruled over the college. 

4. And it came to pass that many of the elders, who were 
captains over the other members of the Sanhedrim and drivers 
dwellers among the Caddoites were made rulers over the college. 

5. Now there was John P., whose surname was Scott, and 
who was a dweller among the Shreveportites, and chief ruler 
over the Progressive League, to which aforetime the spies had 
sold the college, and many other dwellers among the Shreve- 
portites, who were made members of the new Board of Trustees, 
notwithstanding the city which was called Shreveport was more 
than two thousand furlongs from the land of the Jacksonites, 
and the province of East Feliciana, in which the college is set up. 

6. Now John, whose surname was Sawyer, and who was 
ruler over the Legal Conference, was made chief ruler over the 
new Board of Trustees. 

7. Now Charlie-riah, the scribe, hath spoken aforetime in 
the Sanhedrim many things which would come to pass, and 
which things did come to pass as touching the non-removal of 
the College. 



23 



8 Now there are certain ones among the new Board of 
Trustees and among the Elders of the synagogues who will not 
bow down to the Shreveportites least the whole Annual Conference 
be brought into bondage and compelled to make brick and gather 
their own straw as did the children of Israel in the land of Egypt. 

9. Now the last plague that was visited on the college in 
the form ot a bill before the lawmakers of the land for the re- 
moval of the college is sleeping the sleep of the "seven sleepers" 
in the bosom of a committee of the lawmakers of the land. 

10. Now Charlie-riah, the scribe, is still a dweller in the 
land of the Jacksonites, and it is written in all the writs and the 
writings and the deeds and the decrees, which come down from 
the judges of the land, and in the deeds, which John whose sur- 
name is Sawyer hath signed, that the College, even Centenary, is 
to remain in the Province of East Feliciana and in the city of 
the Jacksonites. 

Charlie-riah, the Scribe, Whose Surname is Mieeer. 



N B -This little pamphlet was gotten up at considerable expense. Read it care- 
fully and if you think it worth 50 cents and wish to assist in defraying the expense send 
us the amount. If not, accept same with compliments of tfle author. Four copies for 
distribution for S1.0O.--C. C. M. 



24 



Opinions ol DisJinguished Aen. 



"In my late canvass over the State in every parish and com- 
munity, I met students and graduates of Centenary College. 
Their influence for good is felt everywhere in society, in business 
and official life. The alumni of Centenary have filled the high- 
est judicial stations in our State with credit and distinction. 
The most honored of the legal profession, the most eloquent di- 
vines, and the leaders in all useful dignified lines of life are her 
sens. If I were called upon to say what school had left the 
greatest and best impress upou society, business and government 
of Lotiisiana, I would unhesitatingly say — Centenary College." 
— Senator Murphy J. Foster. 



"The Mississippi Valley Railroad and the Jackson Railroad 
render the College easily accessible from all parts of the country. 
By State statute the selling of alcoholic drinks is forbidden with- 
in five miles of the College. The Parish of East Feliciana is a 
"Dry" parish by local option. Best moral influences. Thorough 
scholarship. Healthful climate. Large beautiful campus." — 
Rev. Hem y Beach Carre. 

"Centenary College is an ideal Christian college. I have 
travelled all over this Southland and have seen but one other 
like it. It is Academis." — General John B. Gordon. 



"If I had one hundred sons, I would send ninety-nine of 
them to Centenary College and perhaps the other one to Vander- 
bilt University."— Captain J. N. Pharr. 



"There ought to be men in South Louisiana or elsewhere in 
the State to put a cash endowment of at least §100,000 behind 
Miller and the College." — Rev. John T. Sawyer.